Why Is Squat the Best Exercise For Strength, Legs, and Muscle!

Looking for the best squat workouts to target your glutes? This evidence-informed article explores techniques to optimize glute engagement using dumbbells for a sculpted lower body.

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Importance of Squats

There’s no denying the importance of squats workouts in fitness and strength training. As a fundamental movement pattern rooted in our daily lives, squat exercises are more than just a gym staple.

It’s evidence of the incredible capabilities of the human body. From building muscle and strength to improving functional mobility, the squat truly stands as a pillar of physical prowess.

Personal Experience with Squats

Being an avid fitness enthusiast and certified personal trainer for years, I can confidently say that squats have played an essential role in shaping my own journey. From the moment I first stepped into the gym, the sheer power and effectiveness of this exercise were undeniable.

Over time, my passion for squats only grew stronger, as I witnessed firsthand the transformative changes it brought about in my physique, strength, and overall well-being.

Proper Squat Form

Stance and Foot Position

Mastering proper squat form is crucial to maximizing the benefits of this exercise while minimizing the risk of injury. One of the most important aspects of proper form is your stance and foot position.

A standard stance, with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and your toes pointed slightly outward, allows for optimal hip external rotation and greater depth in your squat. This, in turn, promotes better glute activation and overall squat performance.

Depth and Movement Pattern

Depth is another key factor in executing a proper squat. While individual flexibility and body mechanics may vary, aiming for a depth where your thighs are at least parallel to the floor is generally recommended for optimal glute activation.

Furthermore, the movement pattern itself is crucial – rather than driving your knees forward, which can put undue stress on the joints, focus on hinging at the hips and pushing your butt back as if sitting in a chair. This hip-hinge pattern not only engages your glutes more effectively but also helps maintain proper spinal alignment throughout the movement.

Engaging Core and Maintaining Posture

Finally, engaging your core muscles and maintaining proper posture is essential for a safe and effective squat. Keep your chest upright, shoulders back and down, and your spine in a neutral position throughout the movement.

Avoid rounding your back or letting your knees cave inward, as these common mistakes can compromise your form and increase the risk of injury. Instead, brace your core, maintain a neutral pelvic tilt, and keep your knees aligned with your toes as you descend and ascend from the squat.

The Best Squat Workouts

Back Squat

The back squat[1] is perhaps the most widely recognized and fundamental squat variation. With the barbell positioned across the upper back, this exercise targets the quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, and core muscles simultaneously. It’s an excellent starting point for those new to squatting and serves as a foundation for more advanced variations.

Barbell Squat | 3 GOLDEN RULES! (MADE BETTER!) (Video Credit: ScottHermanFitness YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Set up a barbell at about shoulder height on a weighted squat rack.
  • Step under the bar and position it across the back of your shoulders, gripping the bar slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.
  • Lift your chest, keep your core braced, and maintain a neutral spine.
  • Take the bar out of the rack and stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes pointed slightly outward.
  • Initiate the squat by sending your hips back while bending at the knees, keeping your heels planted and chest upright.
  • Descend until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Focus on pushing your knees outward to engage your glutes.
  • Keep your core tight and maintain a neutral spine throughout the movement.
  • Inhale on the way down, exhale on the way up.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-5 sets of 6-10 reps
  • For power and explosive strength: 4-6 sets of 2-5 reps with heavier weight

Benefits:

  • Builds overall strength and power best lower body workouts
  • Activates multiple major muscle groups simultaneously
  • Increases functional mobility and movement patterns

Front Squat

The front squat, where the barbell is held across the front of the shoulders, offers a unique challenge and emphasizes the quad muscles more than the traditional back squat. This variation can be particularly beneficial for athletes or those looking to improve their Olympic lifting performance, as it mimics the positioning of the clean movement.

How To Front Squat (WAYS TO KEEP YOUR CHEST UP!) (Video Credit: Squat University YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Grab a barbell with a grip slightly wider than shoulder-width, and raise your elbows until your upper arms are parallel to the floor.
  • Rest the barbell across the front of your shoulders, keeping your elbows high.
  • Set your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes slightly outward.
  • Keeping your chest upright and core braced, send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a squat.
  • Descend until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Keep your elbows high throughout the movement to maintain an upright torso.
  • Focus on keeping the bar balanced and stable across your shoulders.
  • Use a cross-grip or straps if needed to maintain a secure grip.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-4 sets of 6-10 reps
  • For improved Olympic lifting performance: 4-6 sets of 3-5 reps

Benefits:

  • Increased quadriceps development
  • Improved core stability and upper back strength
  • Carries over to Olympic lifting movements

Goblet Squat

The goblet squat is a fantastic option for beginners or those looking to reinforce proper squat mechanics. By holding a dumbbell or kettlebell at chest level, the goblet position acts as a counterbalance, encouraging an upright torso and better control throughout the movement. This variation is also highly accessible, as it can be performed with minimal equipment.

Perform Dumbbell Goblet Squat (Video Credit: Physique Development YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Hold a dumbbell or kettlebell vertically at chest height, gripping it close to your body.
  • Set your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes slightly outward.
  • Keeping your chest upright and core braced, send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a squat.
  • Descend until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor, ensuring your elbows stay inside your knees.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Focus on keeping the weight close to your body throughout the movement.
  • Use a lighter weight initially to prioritize proper form.
  • Engage your core to maintain an upright torso position.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-4 sets of 10-15 reps
  • For beginners or mobility work: 2-3 sets of 15-20 reps

Benefits:

  • Helps reinforce proper squat mechanics and upright torso position
  • Accessible for beginners and those with mobility limitations
  • Targets quadriceps, glutes, and core

Safety Squat Bar Squat

For those seeking a comfortable and shoulder-friendly alternative to the traditional back squat, the safety squat bar squat is an excellent choice. This specialized barbell features camber and padding, allowing for a more upright torso position and reduced strain on the shoulders while still enabling heavy loading.

Safety Squat Olympic Bar V2 | Titan Fitness (Video Credit: Titan Fitness YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Set up a safety squat bar in a squat rack or on the floor.
  • Step under the bar and grip the handles, positioning the cambers across your shoulder blades.
  • Unrack the bar and stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes slightly outward.
  • Keeping your chest upright and core braced, send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a squat.
  • Descend until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Maintain an upright torso position throughout the movement.
  • Brace your core to support the weight and maintain spinal alignment.
  • Consider using gymnastic wrist wraps or straps for a secure grip on the handles.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-5 sets of 6-10 reps
  • For lower body power development: 4-6 sets of 3-5 reps with heavier weight

Benefits:

  • Reduces strain on the shoulders and upper back
  • Allows for an upright torso position
  • Loads the legs and hips while minimizing spinal stress

Bodyweight Squat

Sometimes, stripping away external resistance and focusing solely on mastering the movement pattern can be incredibly valuable. The bodyweight squat is an excellent warm-up exercise and a crucial prerequisite for those new to squatting. Once proper form is established, you can gradually progress to weighted variations.

How to Do a Body-Weight Squat | Health (Video Credit: Health YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, toes slightly outward.
  • Engage your core and keep your chest upright.
  • Send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a squat.
  • Descend until your thighs are at least parallel to the floor.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Focus on keeping your knees aligned with your toes throughout the movement.
  • Engage your glutes at the bottom of the squat to initiate the upward movement.
  • Use your arms for counterbalance if needed.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general mobility and warm-up: 2-3 sets of 10-15 reps
  • For muscular endurance: 3-4 sets of 15-20 reps

Benefits:

  • Reinforces proper squat mechanics and movement patterns
  • Improves mobility and flexibility
  • Accessible for all fitness levels

Box Squat

The box squat is a versatile variation that can be tailored to individual needs and goals. By squatting to a box or bench set at an appropriate height, this exercise allows for a controlled range of motion[2], making it particularly beneficial for those with mobility limitations or those seeking to target specific depths or ranges of motion.

Box Squat Movement Demo (Video Credit: The Active Life YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Set a plyo box or bench at the appropriate height behind you (typically around parallel or slightly below).
  • Stand with your feet about shoulder-width apart, holding a barbell across your upper back.
  • Send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a squat until you’re seated on the box.
  • Pause briefly, then drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Focus on controlling the descent and avoid dropping onto the box.
  • Keep your chest upright and core braced throughout the movement.
  • Adjust the box height based on your mobility and goals (higher for less depth, lower for greater depth).

Sets and Reps:

  • For strength and power development: 4-6 sets of 3-6 reps
  • For hypertrophy and muscle building: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps

Benefits:

  • Builds strength and power through a controlled range of motion
  • Reduces stress on the knees and lower back
  • Teaches proper squatting mechanics and depth control

Bulgarian Split Squat

The Bulgarian split squat is a unilateral exercise that challenges balance, stability, and single-leg strength. By elevating one leg behind you, this variation not only works the quadriceps and glutes but also helps address any muscular imbalances between sides, making it a valuable addition to any well-rounded squat routine.

How To Do Bulgarian Split Squats (Video Credit: PureGym YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Stand facing away from a flat weight bench or plyo box, placing one foot on top of it behind you.
  • Keep your torso upright and engage your core.
  • Send your hips back and bend your front leg to lower into a lunge position, allowing your rear knee to approach the floor.
  • Push through your front heel to return to the starting position.
  • Complete all reps on one side before switching legs.

Pro Tips:

  • Keep your front knee aligned with your toes to avoid excessive strain.
  • Maintain an upright torso position throughout the movement.
  • Use a weight (DB weight, kettlebell, or barbell) to increase the challenge.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps per leg
  • For single-leg power and endurance: 2-3 sets of 15-20 reps per leg

Benefits:

  • Builds single-leg strength and stability
  • Targets the quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings
  • Improves balance and coordination

Pistol Squat

The pistol squat is widely regarded as one of the most challenging squat variations, requiring exceptional balance, flexibility, and overall body control.
While mastering this movement takes time and dedication, the rewards are plentiful – improved single-leg strength, coordination, and a sense of accomplishment that few exercises can match.

Single-Leg Squat – Glute Strengthening Exercises for Runners (Video Credit: 3v YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Stand on one leg, extending your other leg out in front of you.
  • Engage your core and keep your chest upright.
  • Send your hips back and bend your standing leg to lower into a deep squat, allowing your extended leg to move forward.
  • Descend as far as you can while keeping your heel planted.
  • Drive through your heel to return to the starting position.
  • Complete all reps on one side before switching legs.

Pro Tips:

  • Use a support (wall, pole, etc.) to assist with balance if needed.
  • Keep your extended leg parallel to the floor throughout the movement.
  • Consider using a counterweight (dumbbell or kettlebell) to help maintain balance.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and skill development: 2-3 sets of 5-8 reps per leg
  • For advanced single-leg strength: 3-4 sets of 3-5 reps per leg

Benefits:

  • Builds exceptional single-leg strength and balance
  • Challenges core stability and overall body control
  • Improves mobility and flexibility

Dumbbell Sumo Squat

For those seeking a more accessible weighted variation or a change of pace from the traditional barbell squat workout, the dumbbell sumo squat is an excellent choice. By holding a dumbbell between your legs in a wide stance, this exercise allows you to keep the load closer to your center of gravity, making it easier to maintain proper form and target the inner thighs and glutes more effectively.

Dumbbell Sumo Deadlift (Full Tutorial) – Dumbbell Only Glute Exercises (Video Credit:
Mike | J2FIT Strength & Conditioning YouTube Channel)

How to Do It:

  • Stand with your feet wider than shoulder-width apart, toes pointed slightly outward.
  • Hold a dumbbell vertically between your legs, gripping it with both hands.
  • Send your hips back and bend at the knees to lower into a deep squat, keeping your chest upright.
  • Descend as far as your mobility allows, ensuring your thighs are at least parallel to the floor.
  • Drive through your heels to return to the starting position.

Pro Tips:

  • Keep the dumbbell close to your body throughout the movement.
  • Engage your core and maintain an upright torso position.
  • Focus on pushing your knees outward to maximize glute activation.

Sets and Reps:

  • For general strength and muscle building: 3-4 sets of 10-15 reps
  • For hypertrophy and muscle growth: 3-4 sets of 12-15 reps

Benefits:

  • Targets the inner thighs, glutes, and adductors
  • Allows for a greater range of motion
  • Improves hip mobility and stability

Common Squat Mistakes and Fixes

Squatting Over Knees

One of the most common squat mistakes is initiating the movement by bending at the knees rather than hinging at the hips[3]. This not only compromises proper form but can also place undue stress on the knee joints. To fix this issue, try incorporating box squats into your routine, as the presence of a physical reference point can help reinforce proper hip hinge mechanics.

Knees Caving

In Another frequent issue is the tendency for the knees to cave inward during the descent phase of the squat. This often indicates a lack of glute activation and can increase the risk of injury.

To address this, consider using a mini resistance band around your knees during your squats workout – the added tension will encourage you to consciously push your knees outward, engaging your glutes and maintaining proper alignment.

Heels Raising Off the Ground

If you find yourself lifting your heels off the ground as you squat, it’s a clear sign that your hip and ankle mobility needs improvement. This compensatory movement not only compromises your stability but can also shift the load forward, placing unnecessary strain on your knees.

To fix this, try curling your toes upward during the squat to reinforce the use of your heels, and incorporate regular ankle mobility exercises into your warm-up routine or also take supportive knee sleeve for better lifting.

Targeted Muscle Groups

While the squat is often lauded as a comprehensive lower-body exercise, it’s essential to understand the specific muscle groups targeted during this movement. The primary muscles engaged during a proper squat include:

  • Quadriceps: The quadriceps femoris, comprising the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, and vastus intermedius, are the primary knee extensors and work hard during the squat to extend the knees.
  • Hamstrings: The hamstring group (biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus) assists in hip extension and knee flexion during the squat movement.
  • Glutes: The powerful gluteus maximus[4], along with the gluteus medius and minimus, are responsible for hip extension and external rotation, making them critical contributors to a successful squat.
  • Calves: The gastrocnemius and soleus muscles help plantar flex the ankle, providing a stable base and contributing to overall leg drive during the squat.
  • Core: The abdominal muscles, including the rectus abdominis, obliques, and erector spinae, work isometrically to maintain spinal stability and prevent excessive arching or rounding of the back.
  • Upper Back: The trapezius, rhomboids, and other upper back muscles engage to stabilize the barbell and prevent excessive forward lean during loaded squat variations.

By understanding these key muscle groups and their roles, you can better appreciate the full-body nature of the squat and tailor your training to address any specific weaknesses or imbalances.

Benefits of Squat Workouts

Builds Muscle Mass

One of the most significant advantages of squats is their ability to promote substantial muscle growth. As a compound exercise that engages multiple major muscle groups simultaneously, squats are unparalleled in their potential for stimulating hypertrophy.

From the quadriceps to the glutes, hamstrings, and even the core, squats target a comprehensive range of muscles, making them an indispensable component of any well-rounded squat strength training program[5] aimed at building lean, functional muscle mass.

Improves Overall Movement

But squats aren’t just about bulking up; they also play a crucial role in improving overall movement and mobility. As a fundamental human movement pattern, squatting is something we do every day, whether we realize it or not.

By regularly incorporating squats into our workouts, we’re essentially training our bodies to perform this essential movement more efficiently and with better control. This translates to improved functional fitness, reduced risk of injury, and enhanced quality of life.

Increases Jumping Power

Another remarkable benefit of squats workout is their ability to enhance jumping power and explosive strength. As an avid basketball player in my younger years, I can attest to the direct correlation between squatting performance and vertical jump height[6].

By strengthening the muscles responsible for propelling us upwards, squats can provide a significant boost to our jumping ability, making them an invaluable asset for athletes and fitness enthusiasts alike who prioritize power and agility.

Creating an Effective Squat Workouts

Sets and Reps for Different Goals

When designing an effective squat workout, it’s crucial to consider your specific goals and tailor your sets, reps, and progressions accordingly. For muscle building and fat loss, a typical recommendation is three to four sets of six to twelve repetitions, with gradual increases in weight or intensity over time.

This rep range strikes a balance between hypertrophy and strength development[7], ensuring consistent progress.

If your primary goal is strength and power development, lower rep ranges with heavier loads may be more appropriate. For example, sets of three to five reps with near-maximal weights can help build explosive strength and prepare you for activities that require maximum force production, such as powerlifting or certain athletic endeavors.

Progressions and Variations

To keep your squat workouts fresh, challenging, and effective, it’s essential to incorporate progressions and variations regularly. This not only prevents plateaus but also allows you to target specific muscle groups or movement patterns more effectively.

For instance, you might start with bodyweight squats to reinforce proper form, then progress to goblet squats or front squats before eventually working your way up to the back squat and more advanced variations like the safety squat bar squat, or the pistol squat.

Alternatively, you could rotate through different squat variations within a single workout, targeting different muscle groups or emphasizing different aspects of the movement.

For example, a leg day might include sets of back squats for overall lower-body strength, followed by Bulgarian split squats for unilateral development, and finishing with sumo squats to hit the inner thighs and glutes from a slightly different angle.

Personal Reflections and Recommendations

As someone who has been on a lifelong journey of fitness and personal growth, I can say with certainty that the squat has been an indispensable part of my success story. From the moment I first stepped into the gym, the sheer power and effectiveness of this workout captivated me, and my passion for squats has only grown stronger over time.

Through countless workouts, challenges, and triumphs, I’ve witnessed firsthand the transformative changes that a consistent squat practice can bring about – not just in terms of physical strength and muscle development, but also in overall confidence, mobility, and functional fitness.

If there’s one piece of advice I can offer to anyone embarking on their own fitness journey, it’s this: embrace the squat wholeheartedly. Respect the movement, master the proper form, and have the courage to challenge yourself with progressions and variations.

The road ahead may be arduous, but the rewards are immense – a stronger, more capable body and a sense of accomplishment that few other exercises can match.

Remember, squats are not just an workout, they are proof of the incredible capabilities of the human body and a celebration of our innate strength and resilience.

So, take it to the next level, plant your feet firmly on the ground, and prepare to transform and empower yourself. The journey begins with a single squat, but the possibilities are endless.

final-sec verdictThe Takeaway for Squat Workouts

Squats, acclaimed for their fundamental nature, have solidified their status in the realm of exercise. By integrating them into your regimen, you establish a robust and enduring lower body.

This leads to enhanced athletic prowess, superior posture, and an elevated sense of physical capability. Remember, mastering the squat is a journey, not a destination.

Start with proper form, gradually increase the intensity as you build strength, and explore variations to keep things challenging and target different muscle groups. With dedication and consistency, squats can become a cornerstone of your fitness journey, empowering you to conquer your goals and feel fantastic in the process.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Q. What is the most effective squat?
A. For maximizing benefits, the deep squat reigns supreme. Defined by hip creases reaching below the knees, this variation offers superior effectiveness in strengthening your lower body, core, and back.

Q. What is the most effective squat?
A. The 10-7-3-1 squat workout utilizes a descending rep scheme (10, 7, 3, 1) with short rest intervals to challenge both muscular endurance and power development. This method can be applied to different squat variations, such as back squats, for an intense training stimulus.

Q. What will 100 squats for 30 days do?
A. Consistently performing 100 squats daily for 30 days can yield positive outcomes in multiple areas. You might experience increased lower body strength, improved flexibility, enhanced posture, and even a boost in your mental well-being.

Q. How many squats a day is a good workout?
A. Determining the ideal daily squat volume hinges on individual considerations like age, weight, fitness level, and desired outcomes. Beginners can initiate a safe squat program with 2-3 sets of 15 repetitions performed every other day. Progression can involve increasing to 3 sets of 20 repetitions every other day as fitness improves. Consulting a healthcare professional can provide personalized guidance on tailoring a squat routine to your specific needs.

Q. Is squatting the best exercise?
A. Squats hold a prominent position in strength training routines due to their ability to simultaneously activate numerous muscle groups, primarily in the lower body. They are a valuable exercise but may not be the sole “best” option. A well-rounded program incorporates squats alongside other exercises for comprehensive fitness development.

Q. What do squat workouts?
A. Squat exercises constitute a cornerstone of lower body training. They actively engage the quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes, promoting leg strength development, core stability enhancement, and potentially elevating overall athletic performance.

Q. Is squat strength training?
A. Absolutely! Squats are a well-regarded strength training exercise. They target and strengthen major lower body muscle groups, including your quadriceps, glutes, and hamstrings.

Q. What is a good squat weight for a man?
A. Selecting a suitable squat weight hinges on your training experience. Strength standards suggest that untrained men weighing 132 lbs (60 kg) can initiate with a squat weight of roughly 90 lbs (41 kg).

Conversely, advanced lifters of the same bodyweight may be capable of handling up to 280 lbs (127 kg). Collaborating with a certified fitness professional can ensure personalized guidance on weight selection for optimal results.

7 Sources

BodybuildingReviews avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in BodybuildingReviews, you can read more about the editorial process here.

  1. Myer GD, Kushner AM, Brent JL, Schoenfeld BJ, Hugentobler J, Lloyd RS, Vermeil A, Chu DA, Harbin J, McGill SM. The back squat: A proposed assessment of functional deficits and technical factors that limit performance. Strength Cond J. 2014 Dec 1;36(6):4-27. doi: 10.1519/SSC.0000000000000103. PMID: 25506270; PMCID: PMC4262933.
  2. Demers E, Pendenza J, Radevich V, Preuss R. The Effect of Stance Width and Anthropometrics on Joint Range of Motion in the Lower Extremities during a Back Squat. Int J Exerc Sci. 2018 Jun 1;11(1):764-775. PMID: 29997725; PMCID: PMC6033510.
  3. Lorenzetti S, Ostermann M, Zeidler F, Zimmer P, Jentsch L, List R, Taylor WR, Schellenberg F. How to squat? Effects of various stance widths, foot placement angles and level of experience on knee, hip and trunk motion and loading. BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2018 Jul 17;10:14. doi: 10.1186/s13102-018-0103-7. Erratum in: BMC Sports Sci Med Rehabil. 2020 Jan 29;12:7. PMID: 30026952; PMCID: PMC6050697.
  4. Buckthorpe M, Stride M, Villa FD. ASSESSING AND TREATING GLUTEUS MAXIMUS WEAKNESS - A CLINICAL COMMENTARY. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2019 Jul;14(4):655-669. PMID: 31440415; PMCID: PMC6670060.
  5. Takai Y, Fukunaga Y, Fujita E, Mori H, Yoshimoto T, Yamamoto M, Kanehisa H. Effects of body mass-based squat training in adolescent boys. J Sports Sci Med. 2013 Mar 1;12(1):60-5. PMID: 24149726; PMCID: PMC3761779.
  6. Wisløff U, Castagna C, Helgerud J, Jones R, Hoff J. Strong correlation of maximal squat strength with sprint performance and vertical jump height in elite soccer players. Br J Sports Med. 2004 Jun;38(3):285-8. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2002.002071. PMID: 15155427; PMCID: PMC1724821.
  7. Neto WK, Soares EG, Vieira TL, Aguiar R, Chola TA, Sampaio VL, Gama EF. Gluteus Maximus Activation during Common Strength and Hypertrophy Exercises: A Systematic Review. J Sports Sci Med. 2020 Feb 24;19(1):195-203. PMID: 32132843; PMCID: PMC7039033.

Christine VanDoren. PT, CSN, NSCA, ACE

Christine VanDoren, PT & Nutritionist, is a Registered Nutritionist, Sports Nutritionist, and Personal Coach worked with Justin Bauer Fitness.
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